Freedom From Fibroids


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Be Comfortable Again 

Women who suffer from uterine fibroids experience cramping, pelvic pain and heavy bleeding. You no longer need to consider a hysterectomy.

There is an alternative: Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE). UFE is a non-surgical, minimally invasive procedure that's covered by insurance. 

Have questions? Call Jefferson Radiology's uterine fibroid experts today at 860-289-3375.

 

 

 

What is Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE) is a minimally invasive procedure used to treat fibroids, a noncancerous uterine tumor. Fibroids are the most common uterine tumor in the female reproductive system. Symptoms typically include pelvic pain, heavy menstrual bleeding, cramping, and pressure on the pelvic organs. 

Until recently, fibroids were typically treated by performing a hysterectomy, removal of the uterus, or myomectomy (surgical removal of fibroids while preserving the uterus.) Today, there are more options.

Symptoms        Diagnosis & Treatment
Preparing for UFE
 
 

Symptoms

Uterine Fibroids are very common and are found in 25-40% of all women. African American women are at a higher risk for fibroids, with up to 50% of women between the ages of 35 and 45 diagnosed.

Symptoms may include:

  • heavy, prolonged, painful menstrual periods
  • pelvic pain, pressure or heaviness
  • pain in the back or legs
  • pain during sexual intercourse
  • bladder pressure
  • frequent urination
  • abnormally enlarged abdomen

Diagnosis & Treatment

Fibroids are usually diagnosed during a gynecologic internal exam. Determining whether you are an appropriate candidate for Uterine Fibroid Embolization requires careful consideration of all treatment options. Most insurance companies pay for this treatment, but you may want to talk with your interventional radiologist about this before your procedure.

The procedure does not involve surgery. As a much less invasive but just as effective alternative, the physician will guide a small catheter into the uterine arteries and inject small particles, no bigger than a grain of sand that will cause the fibroids to shrink and symptoms to fade.

 

PREPARING FOR UFE
UFE is not painful and takes only one to two hours to perform. You will be made comfortable with IV sedation. After UFE, patients typically spend one night in the hospital and resume light activities within the next few days. The majority of patients are able to resume their normal routine within one week. Six months after the procedure, patients are scheduled for an MRI scan to confirm the succes of the treatment.

 

PROCEDURE SUCCESS & RISKS
Uterine Fibroid Embolization is a successful treatment for thousands of women, with at least 90% reporting significant or total relief from fibroids. UFE is effective at treating multiple fibroids, without harming the uterus.



Women's Health & Pelvic Congestion Syndrome

Pelvic congestion Syndrome (PCS) is an abnormal enlargement of the pelvic, ovarian and uterine veins. These veins have one way valves that normally prevent blood from backing up into the pelvis. When these valves are abnormal then the veins in the pelvis engorge. Blood pools in the pelvis and causes pain, irritation and heavy menstrual bleeding.

Embolization Treatment

Embolization is the technique of blocking up an abnormal blood vessel. Embolization of the Pelvic Congestion Syndrome allows normal veins to form, pain to resolve and a patient to return to normal activity. This is an out patient procedure performed with a small "nick" in the skin with intravenous sedation.

FAQs

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How often is Uterine Fibroid Embolization successful in treating fibroids?

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What are typical complications associated with a Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

 
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How will I feel throughout a Uterine Fibroid Embolization procedure?

 
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How long should I expect to be off work after having a Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

 
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How long should I expect to stay in the hospital after having a Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

 
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What happens to the fibroids after a Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

 
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Will my fibroids or symptoms come back after having a Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

 
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Will I still get my period after having Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

 
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How can fibroids affect sexual intercourse?

 
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What happens after a Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

 
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What is the Uterine Fibroid Embolization procedure like?

 
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What are fibroids?

 
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What are the symptoms of fibroids?

 
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How are fibroids diagnosed?

 
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Who is at risk for fibroids?

 
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Which OBGYNs refer to you for Uterine Fibroid Embolizations?

 
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Why do you prefer Embosphere Microspheres for Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

 

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What kind of follow-up care is typical after a Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

 

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If I have multiple fibroids am I still a good candidate for a Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

 

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Please explain how you would coordinate my care with my OB/GYN.

 

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Are your patients happy with the Uterine Fibroid Embolization procedure?

 

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Will a Uterine Fibroid Embolization be able to treat very large Fibroids?

 

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Will my insurance cover a UFE?

 

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How is an enlarged uterus from fibroids similar to pregnancy?

 

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Is it always necessary to treat fibroids?

 

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Are there medications or natural remedies used to treat fibroids?

 

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What are treatments for fibroids beyond medications?

 

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What are the challenges with a myomectomy?

 

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Please describe the particles used to block the arteries in a uterine fibroid embolization

 

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When is a myomectomy better than a uterine fibroid embolization?

 

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What is more common: the open myomectomy or the laparoscopic myomectomy?

 

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